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Artist Statement

In collaboration with FutureNeuro, I am creating new work for primary learners that will explore epilepsy and neural activity, finding ways to represent and think about this research as a material experience. Through this process I will look at comparisons between hyperconnectivity in the brain, deep neural networks in computing, bacterial bioluminescence in marine life and rhizomatic root systems in nature. The resulting work will consist of multiple elements including a sculptural video installation, cast objects, a series of photographs, an interactive web interface and classroom-based activities. 

SFI Research Centre Statement

Dr Katherine Benson, Dr Cristina Ruedell Reschke, Dr Susan Byrne and Ciara Courtney

The researchers at FutureNeuro in the RCSI work together as a large collaborative team to study the brain and how it works. This team includes clinicians, scientists, geneticists, and researchers who are all committed to understanding the brain. 

The brain and nervous system is made up of millions of cells, called neurons, that connect together to relay signals. These signals control how we think, move, act and interact with the world around us! It is our brain that allows us to connect with people either digitally or in real life. Today’s world is hyperconnected! 

This mesmerising artwork allows us to break inside the brain to experience the connectivity of neurons. Neurons transmit messages using electrical signals and chemical messages which are passed throughout the body. These neurons work together in complex and highly connected networks. A neuron is said to be ‘firing’ when it transmits a signal. As scientists we can study neuronal firing in many ways. In fact we can actually see neurons firing using something called bioluminescence. Interestingly some animals can produce this bioluminescence themselves as a way of communicating.  

We hope this artwork inspires you to ask lots of question about connectivity within the brain and the world outside.